Posts Tagged ‘commercial office design’

Fibonacci Stone and Hassell Studio – an en pointe collaboration – The Australian Ballet

australian ballet

A collaborative spirit is one of hallmarks of Fibonacci Stone, and the beauty and strength of this approach could not be better illustrated than in our recent work with Hassell Studio in their refurbishment of the Australian Ballet headquarters in Melbourne.

Australian Ballet“Leah Hudson-Smith of Hassell wished to specify a terrazzo in a palette of flesh tones, blush and salmon – suggesting the hues of a ballerina’s slipper – which would be used throughout the entry foyer, the main public spaces and in the incredible staircase,” says Creative Director, Michael Karakolis.   “Fibonacci Stone responded to the brief with a new design which we hoped would capture the timeless elegance of ballet, subtly nuancing the dichotomy of dance – and the strength that belies the grace of the steps.”

The tile features flinty shards of those ballet shoe-hues set into a warm neutral base, mixed with larger pieces set to mimic the ‘pas de bourrée’ or quick steps, often done en pointe. “For this reason, we couldn’t resist calling the stone ‘Pavlova’, as Anna Pavlova was widely considered the first to adopt the pointe shoe, and for more obvious reasons… its resemblance to her eponymous and delicious dessert,” says Michael.

The Australian Ballet

The Australian Ballet The Australian BalletThe entire project is a celebration of the beauty and hidden strength of ballet.  Brilliantly conceived spaces for the public, staff and dancers followed painstaking and exacting research – take the staircase as an example: it’s sinuous curves elegantly wrap upwards, much like the ribbon of a ballet slipper, but the width of the staircase is designed to allow two tutu clad ballerinas to pass each other without disturbing their costumes. It’s a beautiful example of function equalling form, brilliantly conceived and executed by Hassell Studio.

“It’s in these wonderful collaborations that we feel Fibonacci Stone can offer our wealth of product knowledge, design nous and imagination to our clients,” says Michael.  “We couldn’t be happier with the depth of our full range – which is always available in stock – but these bespoke commissions really are, the cream on the pav.”

Photography by Lillie Thompson

Dutch Design Week 2015

The biggest design event in Northern Europe, Dutch Design Week took over the city of Eindhoven in October with the work of more than 2400 designers on display for the 250,000 visitors that flocked to the nation’s capital of design.

The Design Academy Eindhoven has produced major Dutch designers, such as Maarten Baas, Marcel Wanders and Richard Hutten, so it’s little wonder that the city forms the backdrop for showcasing new designs each year. Held from 15-25 October, Dutch Design Week is a celebration of all that is new and exciting in the nation’s design scene.

This year’s event focused on the power of designers’ imaginations and posed the question “What if?” to participants and exhibitors. The answers proved to the both imaginative and inspirational.

Dutch Design Week is different from other design events because it concentrates on the designs of the future. “Designers think about how we will live and live together in the future,” says Dutch Design Week director Martijn Paulen. “They dare to question everything, dream of a different answer and shape it. This is how they lay the basis for the innovations of the future.”

Highlights from this year’s event include ‘Soft Concrete’ by Jolijn Pasmans, which sought to make the robust material appear more tactile by combining it with textile techniques and materials.

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Another highlight was a series of 3D printed totems by Elise Luttik + Hester Stolk and a series of colourful and playful room dividers by Dutch Design studio Tijs Gilde.

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Design Academy Eindhoven’s Graduation Show was another standout of the festival. More than 141 projects were presented during Design Week, with highlights including a series of 3D printed ceramics by Olivier van Herpt and an elegant heated bench made from larch wood and bluestone by Ken Tchikaya.

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If this year’s Dutch Design Week provides a glimpse into the future of design, we’re excited about what’s around the corner.

Equip Super by Antarctica

If a work environment plays a key role in employee satisfaction, the team at Equip Super must be a happy bunch of workers. Their new office design by Antarctica is an open, modern space that promotes wellbeing and collaboration.

Equip Super is a Melbourne based superannuation company that was looking to re-locate and re-invigorate its workplace on a single floor with open offices to enhance transparency and teamwork. They engaged Melbourne-based architecture and design studio, Antarctica, to assist in formulating a brief, assessing possible new locations and designing the integrated fitout.

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The new office occupies a 900sqm floor of a 1950s multi-storey building in Melbourne’s CBD. It has a long, narrow plan that is defined by three zones. The first zone comprises the reception, foyer and breakout areas. It is characterised by beautiful natural light, a lush hanging garden and a harmonious mix of materials, including timber and Fibonacci Stone terrazzo tiles.

Fibonacci Stone’s Earth and Arctic Ice terrazzo tiles were chosen for the project. The Earth tiles feature a spectrum of blue-brown tones, which range from pale powder blues through to dark matte browns. The blend creates a warm, natural tonal palette and works beautifully in the new office environment. Arctic Ice tiles are also a complementary feature of the space. With accents of pale grey and cool blue, they are suited to wide range of neutral, cool interior colour schemes. Fibonacci tiles are also highly slip-resistant and require minimal ongoing maintenance, which makes them perfect for commercial applications.

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The new Equip Super office includes a second zone with private meeting pods and offices. There’s also an undulating storage spine that acts as a landscape and acoustic buffer from the third zone, which comprises south-facing open work areas.

The workplace features lots of greenery and open spaces to encourage optimal well being. It’s the kind of office design that makes going to work more appealing.

Tadao Ando’s five concrete masterpieces

Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando is a master of concrete design who creates elegant forms from this robust material.

“I do not believe architecture should speak too much,” he has said of his work. “It should remain silent and let nature, in the guise of sunlight and wind, speak.”

Here are five of his concrete masterpieces.

Church of the Light, Osaka

Completed in 1989, the Church of the Light consists of three concrete cubes, which are penetrated by a wall angled at 15°. The wall is separated by few inches from the roof, allowing light to filter horizontally, giving the impression that the roof is floating in the air. A cruciform, which is cut into the concrete behind the altar, is lit by the morning sun.

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Church of Light: A cruciform within the concrete is lit by the morning sun

 

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas

Made with concrete, steel, aluminum, glass and granite, the museum is perfectly reflected in the surrounding pond. Opened in 2002, it features five long, flat-roofed pavilions that appear to float elegantly on top of the pond.

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Modern Museum of Fort Worth: The buildings of the museum appear to gently float above the pond

 

Hyogo Museum of Art, Kobe

Hyogo Museum was planned as part of the reconstruction scheme after the Kobe Earthquake in 1995 that destroyed much of the Japanese city.

Opened in 2002, the design is composed of three rectangular volumes that sit parallel upon a base platform of white granite. It also features a series of grand, sweeping stairs and ramps.

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Hyogo Museum: The museum features sweeping concrete staircases

 

Centro Roberto Garza Sada at the University of Mexico, Mexico City

The Centro Roberto Garza Sada, also known as the Gate of Creation, is a chunky concrete block designed within the school of art, design and architecture at the University of Mexico.

Entrances are located beneath the building’s raised underside. Rectangular voids at each end expose stairwells and an open-air amphitheatre. The building was completed in 2013.

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Centro Roberto Garza Sada: Concrete creates a sense of solidity to the school of art and design

 

Row house, Osaka

Designed by Ando in 1976, the site is divided into three parts – two enclosed interior volumes and an open-air courtyard. It’s impossible to get to either part of the house without walking through the courtyard.

“No matter how advanced society becomes, institutionally or technologically, a house in which nature can be sensed represents for me the ideal environment in which to live,” Ando said of his design.

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Row House: Ando’s first residential project, the Row House is cast in concrete

 

Image credits:

Tadao Ando's five concrete masterpieces 06Church of light – cgarchitect.com

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth – themodern.org and Christina Patoski

Hyogo Museum of Art – kwc.org

Centro Roberto Garza Sada – dezeen.com

Row House – artisanmagazin.de

Tadao Ando – wikipedia

Out on a limb – concrete cantilevers

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Cantilevers have been called vanity extensions for architects – if you want to make a design statement, just add a concrete cantilever. But cantilevers can serve a purpose beyond the bold aesthetic. Here are five of the best.

Stamp House by Charles Wright Architects

Charles Wright Architects were engaged to design a carbon neutral house on an off-grid site on the edge of a Far North Queensland rainforest. The house was awarded Far North Queensland House of the Year in the Australian Institute of Architects’ 2014 Awards.

The concrete structure has been engineered and insulated to incorporate a total solar-panelled roof. It also includes water harvesting, grey water recycling and irrigation facilities. The massive cantilevers are designed to lessen the impact of potential flooding and, as the house is Category 5 cyclone proof, it is officially classed as a cyclone shelter.

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Stamp House (image source wrightarchitects.com.au) – The house is also classed as a cyclone shelter

Issam Fares Institute by Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid’s latest design, the Issam Fares Institute at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon, features striking cantilevers over a public courtyard and a series of elevated pathways. The cantilevers make the building appear to float above the ground, significantly reducing its footprint.

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Issam Fares Institute (image source dezeen.com) – The cantilevers work to reduce the footprint of the building

Hemeroscopium House by Ensamble Studio

Inspired by the mythical Greek paradise where the sun sets, Hemeroscopium House is located in Las Rozas, just outside of Madrid. The house took a year to design and engineer but just three weeks to construct. It features interlocking, prefabricated concrete beams and a show-stopper swimming pool that cantilevers across the second storey.

The massive concrete beams appear to float above the glass panels that line the majority of the first floor. This helps achieve the architects’ vision of turning “weight into lightness”.

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Hemeroscopium House (image source ensamble.info) – The house features a striking concrete cantilevered swimming pool

Aggrenad Hotel by AND

Korean architects AND designed this hotel on Geoje Island to resemble a hand of outstretched fingers, with rooms and balconies pointing in different directions.

Located in a seafront fishing village, the hotel contains just five suites and a café and was designed to give each guest a different view of the surrounding archipelago.

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Aggrenad Hotel (image source Dezeen.com) – The hotel was designed as a hand with outstretched fingers

House 20 by Jolson

House 20 by Melbourne Architect Jolson features a series of concrete blades cantilevering over a bronze wall. They almost appear to be balancing on the wall, creating a beautiful sculptural form. But the cantilevers aren’t just for show – the blades also penetrate the interior of the house, forming a series of individual rooms.

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Jolson House (image source homedsgn.com) – The concrete cantilevers appear to rest on the bronze wall

 

NEW SEASCAPE TERRAZZO STONE ADDS A SUBTLE AND ELEGANT BURST OF COLOUR TO FLOORING.

We pride ourselves on holding a unique level of expertise in developing custom terrazzo finishes for commercial projects – a skill which is strongly evidenced in our latest tile Seascape.

Seascape terrazzo was originally conceived as a custom colour via collaboration between Fibonacci Stone and leading interior designer Kerry Phelan.

After further research and development by the Fibonacci Stone team and in consultation with the client, Seascape now proudly occupies a permanent position In the Fibonacci Stone collection.

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Among Seascape’s many endearing qualities is its subtle blue composition, contrasted with muted white and light grey marble aggregate chips. The result is an understated, nevertheless colourful tonal palette.

The resulting soft pastel blue perfectly imbues a sense of on trend 1950s optimism whilst the introduction of the sophisticated marble accents in grey-scale – shifts Seascape’s tonal composition away from retro and into an elegantly contemporary aesthetic

As with all Fibonacci Stone terrazzo tiles, Seascape combines quality and strength with beauty, safety and exemplary environmental credentials. Infact Fibonacci Stone is the only terrazzo supplier to achieve a 100 per cent Green Star rating from the green building council of Australia.

Seascape’s marble-based composition offers a compelling solution for those seeking the beauty of natural marble yet require a low maintenance and hard-wearing flooring solution.

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Seascape terrazzo tiles are individually made to order and in custom sizes to achieve a thin, versatile, flexible tile with advanced strength, durability and longevity. Heavy-duty and lasting upwards of 30 years, terrazzo tiles suit a wide range of applications including hospitality, shopping centres, retail interiors and foyers along with residential projects. Not least, they are safe, hygienic and easy to maintain.

The unique mix of colours and tones contained in the aggregate of Fibonacci Stone terrazzo, enables the tiles to adapt to suit changing interior colour schemes – a trait that further extends the life-cycle of this versatile material.

See the complete Fibonacci Stone range here

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Award-worthy designs from Australian Institute of Architects

Entries for this year’s Australian Institute of Architects Victorian Architecture Awards have now closed and the winners will be announced at a ceremony next month. The awards program provides public and peer recognition of the innovative work of Victorian architects.

Two key projects that have caught our eye include The Pod by Whiting Architects, which is among the Residential field of entrants, and the Spectroscopy Innovation and Technology Centre (SITC) by SKM, which is sits among the Commercial entries.

The Pod by Whiting Architects is a standalone, custom-made three-storey building designed from the inside-out. Standing beside the main residence, the sculptural form was designed to maximise views and natural light and has direct access to the beach.

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The design, which features two 20-tonne concrete boxes that appear to be randomly stacked, is a response to the challenging site, which has a strong slope and is split in two by an easement.

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Agilent Technologies’ $25M Spectroscopy Innovation and Technology Centre (SITC) is dedicated to the study of light. Its design meets two key requirements – its spaces communicate the essence of spectroscopy (the study of how light passes through things) and also transform how Agilent’s Research and Development team work.

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The mixed materials work to create opacity, transparency and shadow within the one site. Individual alcoves create ‘neighbourhoods’ throughout the space – there are areas for small teams and solo work to support staff needs across a range of roles and project types. Colours from the visible light spectrum provide texture and depth to the design.

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The social heart of the SITC is the ‘Town Square’, which includes a café and sunken courtyard and is surrounded by the geometric forms of the concrete staircases.

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The building’s exterior is wrapped in a ‘veil’ that offers shifting experiences of light and shadow to employees and the public. It’s a solid reflection of the research conducted inside.

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Winners of the Victorian Architecture awards will be announced on 20 June.

Image credits:

The Pod – credit Whiting Architects

STIC – images sourced from Archdaily. Photography by Peter Bennets

Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table

We got to know Nicola Grey & Tara Wilcox from Redfox and Wilcox a few months ago after they approached us with an idea to use Fibonacci Stone Terrazzo tiles as table tops – needless to say we jumped at the opportunity to assist them in making their idea become a reality and so, we are very happy to say, the Little Italy side table was born.

Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table 1Redfox & Wilcox is a Melbourne based design workshop that’s been busily making handmade furniture since 2011. Specialising in custom furniture designs for residential, hospitality and commercial use they draw on a local network of metal fabricators and finishers to produce components before finishing their products in the Redfox & Wilcox workshop. Working predominantly with locally recycled timber, including basketball courts and parquet floors, Redfox & Wilcox create interesting and unique tables and stools.

The Little Italy range of tables is the latest product from Redfox & Wilcox and sees the transition from recycled timber to recycled stone in the form of our very own Fibonacci Stone Terrazzo.

So far the tables are available with either Earth or Nougat terrazzo tops with a combination of white or grey metal bases which are conveniently zinc coated before painting meaning that Little Italy tables can be enjoyed both indoors or outdoors.

Excitingly the duo’s instagram feed recently showed that Little Italy’s frames have been prototyped in brass and copper, so we are really looking forward to seeing some new terrazzo finishes added to the range soon.

Check out the full range of Little Italy side tables below or click here

Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table 7 Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table 6   Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table 3 Redfox and Wilcox present the Little Italy terrazzo table 2

All photography by www.maguri.net

Arctic Ice – The cool crisp terrazzo tile from Fibonacci Stone

Fibonacci Stone’s Arctic Ice Terrazzo reconstituted stone tiles spectrum of pale greys and cool blue accents provides a subtle and versatile finish suited to wide range of interior colour schemes where a neutral, cool and textured finish is desired.

Arctic Ice Terrazzo Tiles are ideal for both residential and commercial flooring applications as they possess a high slip resistance, require minimal ongoing maintenance and have a lifespan of over 30 years.

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Fibonacci Stone Arctic Ice Terrazzo Tile at 400 x 400 mm

Arctic Ice Terrazzo tiles are ideal for both residential and commercial flooring applications as they possess a high slip resistance, require minimal ongoing maintenance and have a lifespan of over 30 years. Plus as the only terrazzo tile supplier to achieve a 100 per cent Green Star rating, Fibonacci Stone’s Arctic Ice Terrazzo also provides a flooring solution that not only answer a wide range of aesthetic and budget requirements but also provides an ethical and environmental flooring solution for all interior situations.

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An arrangement of 4 Fibonacci Stone Arctic Ice terrazzo tiles – each tile at 400 x 400 mm

As with all of Fibonacci Stone’s tiles, Arctic Ice terrazzo stone tiles are manufactured from a unique blend of natural materials including mineral aggregates and pigments. This process provides Fibonacci Stone products with a finish ideal for spanning areas where both a uniform colour / texture and subtle variations in pattern and tone are preferred.

Fibonacci Stone’s Arctic Ice Terrazzo Tiles are purpose-made to provide flexible and reliable hard surface solutions that meet a wide range of functional and aesthetic requirements and is available in two standard tile sizes.

Fibonacci Stone’s Arctic Ice Terrazzo tiles are available in the following standard tile sizes

600x600x20mm

400x400x15mm

For a quote please click here

For more information about Arctic Ice tiles and to request your free sample click here

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A close up sample of Arctic Ice terrazzo tile at 100 x 100 mm

 

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles from Fibonacci Stone – The bold and beautiful flooring soloution

Fibonacci Stone’s unique Graphite Terrazzo Tiles’ bold, subtle complexity is achieved through its deep grey and warm brown particles highlighted with white accents.

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles are manufactured from reconstituted marble aggregates, cement and an exclusive pigment oxide which combine to produce a stunningly natural and bold flooring surface that requires minimal maintenance.

From residential bathrooms through to public stairwells Graphite Terrazzo Tiles is an ideal foundation for interior schemes requiring a dark and hard-wearing floor that possesses the same luxurious appeal as natural marble tiles but without the maintenace, cost and colour variations which are an inherent issue with natural stone.

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles installed at the Royal Flying Doctors Head Office

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles installed at the Royal Flying Doctors Head Office

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles are ideal for both residential and commercial flooring applications as they possess a high slip resistance, require minimal ongoing maintenance and have a lifespan of over 30 years. Plus as the only terrazzo tile supplier to achieve a 100 per cent Green Star rating, Fibonacci Stone’s Graphite Terrazzo also provides a flooring solution that not only answer a wide range of aesthetic and budget requirements but also provides an ethical and environmental flooring solution for all interior situations.

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A single Graphite terrazzo tile at 600 x 400 mm

As with all of Fibonacci Stone’s tiles, Graphite terrazzo stone tiles are manufactured from a unique blend of natural materials including mineral aggregates and pigments. This process provides Fibonacci Stone products with a finish ideal for spanning areas where both a uniform colour / texture and subtle variations in pattern and tone are preferred.

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles installed to the stairwells at AAMI Park stadium

Graphite Terrazzo Tiles installed to the stairwells at AAMI Park stadium

Fibonacci Stone’s Graphite Terrazzo Tiles are purpose-made to provide flexible and reliable hard surface solutions that meet a wide range of functional and aesthetic requirements and is available in three standard tile sizes.

Fibonacci Stone Graphite Terrazzo is available in the following standard tile sizes

600x600x20mm

400x400x15mm

600x400x18mm

For a quote please click here

For more information about Graphite Terrazzo Tiles tiles and to request your free sample click here

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An arrangement of 4 Graphite terrazzo tiles at 600 x 400 mm each

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Close up sample of a graphite terrazzo tile at 100 x 100 mm